A statement for RESPOND. and SEEING THE ELEPHANT

Within in the past decade, intent has never been more scrutinized. Propaganda has slowly evolved into a nuanced being, encompassing charged spaces, placing shrouds over those easily persuaded or tired of questioning.

We have all “seen the elephant,” but only some of us are willing to challenge conformity, eager to knock down the remaining pillars of misdirection. As a man born into oppression, I am taught to fear what will happen between us once all the pillars have fallen. How does a systematically trained mind interact after experiencing complete disillusionment? The possibility of an infinite list of uninhibited choices, not altered by deeply rooted conditions, can be overwhelming. By tasting the autonomy of what once belonged to the supreme, how do we not become the elephant itself? There is a desire to find out.

I aim to create what embodies a unique strength expounded by the oppressed. A power manifested in resilient peoples, determined to resist erasure and contradict dominant narratives. My intent is not to perpetuate powerlessness, but a need to frame explicit depictions of the humanity deprived of bodies and faces, demanding liberation from the elite in Baltimore City and beyond.

 

 

A statement for BETWEEN US

On January 29th, 2016, a fifteen-year-old African American male named Darius Montray Bardney was tragically murdered in at housing complex in West Baltimore called Pedestal Gardens.

The property’s management team, Community Builders, Inc., commissioned “Between Us” to celebrate the life of Darius, embolden the youth of Pedestal Gardens, and help resolve any contention that transpired after the incident.

 

 

A statement for BURIEDSTOLEN FACES, and PRIMITIVE PROJECTIONS

We can never truly define ourselves, but we try to make peace with that knowledge by using our body and possessions to project a temporary character. It is in our nature to identify others for self-assessment. While looking at each nameless individual, I ask myself, “Do I relate to what I am seeing, or do I feel excluded?”

Our primal need to identify has been corrupted by prejudices. Is there value beyond the signifiers? Has being judged by others made us violent and vulnerable creatures?

Inheritance led us to obscurity, pessimistic recesses of the Earth with deafening winds, putrid soil, and blistering fire.

My mission, as an archaeologist, is to uncover the forgotten pieces of us that remain and address humanity’s aggression.